5 Comments

  1. Scott Kearns

    Thanks for the blog (as always). I found it funny (in a good way), that Joh Prine’s lyrics are in red. It made me think of those Bibles where the words of Jesus were printed in red. Nice to see John Prine has been equally elevated 🙂

    Reply
    1. Marcia

      Thank you, Scott. I love that! I hadn’t even thought of the red in terms of the Bibles that use red to highlight what Jesus “really” said. I does allow us to play with the idea of the “real Jesus” even further. Thanks for having the eyes to see that!
      Peace,
      Marcia

      Reply
  2. Janet Beatty

    There are many books that theorize on the “missing years” of Jesus, each imagining (I think) help to provide insight into the more human aspect of this God/Man. I especially liked “The Gospel According to Jesus” by Portuguese author José Saramago. Like “The Last Temptation of Christ” by Nikos Kazantzakis, Saramago strives to picture the very human side of Jesus as a boy and young man before the Gospel stories pick up the narrative. It isn’t that I want to know the “real” Jesus, but rather that I want to know that he was a lot like me with his fears, doubts, struggles, hopes and dreams. I think the church and culture both have deified Jesus beyond recognition. Thank you for continuing to challenge us with your own insights.

    Reply
    1. Marcia

      Dear Janet,
      Thank you for sharing those titles. It sounds like perspectives that bring the human aspect of Jesus’ nature into clearer relief are important to you and where/how you meet Him. I wonder if a lot of the tradition that built up in church dogmatics around sexuality and ipso facto around Jesus’ lack of sexuality relate to your point here. So much of the expulsion of Jesus’ humanity became theologically/dogmatically necessary if Jesus were somehow to be free of the “taint” of sexuality and sexual intimacy with a woman. Maybe these other aspects of Jesus’ humanity were collateral damage in that ecclesial battle–which, by the way, is not really biblically based on many counts.
      Thank you again for sharing your always helpful reflections!
      Peace,
      Marcia

      Reply
      1. Janet Beatty

        Interesting. I hadn’t thought much about the deification of Jesus connected to his sexuality. I know Kazantzakis uses that as part of his depiction of the humanity of Jesus. That is not part of Saramago’s story. But what you say is so true–the church/dogma had to purify the man so that he was not only free of his sexuality, but in a way, free of the ‘taint” of women. After all, for centuries women were often considered an evil necessity within Christianity. And in doing so (deifying Jesus), the church (in history) vilified sexuality. But Jesus, was, after all, a man/god, a human like the rest of us and must by his very nature have been a sexual being. And yes, knowing Jesus the man informs my knowledge of Jesus the God.

        Ah, what tangled webs we weave. . . . Thank God we are changing!

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