7 Comments


  1. Marcia, thanks for writing this! Honor/Integrity codes on college campuses are good, and at the same time the number of those brought up on charges is absurd– the number of black men and athletes specifically (mostly by white students). At UVA they had to take a deeper look into this racial profiling because the trends could not be defended. And lastly– I echo your thoughts on the Atlantic piece. There is so much there.

    Reply
    1. Marcia

      Thank you, Charlene, for your comment and your insights. I am glad to know that UVA looked into the disparities and disturbing trends. That process could provide some wisdom for other places. Was it something the administration launched? Or was it a student led investigation? Thank you for being a part of this conversation, Charlene. I hope you’ll keep reading and commenting.

      Reply
  2. Sioux Finney

    Marcia — Thank you for your insight and honesty. As you know, the feelings named “hazardous” to the “white” worldview are the Holy Spirit calling us to name, claim, repent and change. As a middle school teacher, I know these conversations need to start in middle school and high school on the field and the court and beyond. Preach, preach! Shalom.

    Reply
    1. Marcia

      Thank you for your comments, Sioux. You are so right about the conversations needing to start early and often. I also think that having substantive cross-cultural relationships is something God is calling us toward more and more. The Holy Spirit’s call is not to stasis, that’s for sure. I am thankful for how you modeled these courageous conversations and substantive relationships to me in my youth. Peace to you!

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  3. Janet Beatty

    Thank you, Marcia, for your bravery in tackling a touchy issue. I read the Atlantic article with great interest for the insights it provoked.

    The vast majority of white people live in a world of unconscious invulnerability. We are so deeply unaware of our station in life that we aren’t aware of it when we pass a black panhandler and avert our eyes or gaze with disgust at the Chinese woman plowing through trash bins for a bottle or can to sell to augment her meager income. When that unconscious invulnerability merges with power and money the results are devastating. Jesus told us to care for the most vulnerable among us, but when power and money combine with unconscious invulnerability it is the vulnerable among us who suffer the most.

    What has happened at the schools like UNC and Penn State is but a tip of an iceberg and indicative of a much more pervasive problem/issue of racism throughout the institutions of this country, including the churches. As long as we, as white people, refuse to see past our privilege, or to even SEE our privilege, the “plantation mentality” mentioned in the Atlantic article will continue.

    It is sad. It hurts my heart.

    Reply
    1. Marcia

      Thank you, Janet. I think one thing that white people fear the most is our own vulnerability and we avoid situations in which we have to feel that vulnerability. We avoid situations where we might feel or even be incompetent or in need ourselves. It is deeply wounding for us as it denies our human condition, our interdependence, and our dependence on God. I agree that it is deeply grievous, a lot is lost, a lot is diminished. It hurts your heart and it hurts all hearts whether we are acknowledge the wound or not. Thank you again for enriching the conversation.

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