13 Comments

  1. Michael Shalosky

    Coming from a football family.This is just a FRAME in a LONG running movie..Gods grace is always with you and you family.Good things will be happening to good people,as are you and John.It is unfortunate that you must LIVE thru it..It will pass.The sun will come up tomorrow.Lift up the cross every day.I know you do..Things will work out.Susan and I are praying for you both..MGS

    Reply
    1. Marcia

      Thanks, Mike. There is always the next play–always another chance for redemption. I love that about football!

      Reply
  2. Jim Stewart

    Marcia, the football situation at UNC is but another example of our brokenness and need for reconciliation. I just finished a sermon Joseph’s reconciliation with his brothers using the Confession of 1967. It’s a pretty remarkable document and its implications are far reaching. Blessings.

    Reply
    1. Marcia

      Thank you, Jim, for your comment. The Confession of 1967 is a strong statement. The interesting piece for me is that the section on ministries of Reconciliation locates our capacity to envision and enact reconciliation in the power of Jesus Christ’s resurrection and the promise of the second coming. That transforming victory over death and the promise that there is more to come tell us that God is always at work creating conditions for renewal and new life.
      The interesting thing about thinking about reconciliation when it comes to Joseph’s story is that he forgave his brothers from a position of favor, from a position of power. Reconciliation’s capacity for healthy transformation and healing often rests in how power is distributed and used. I think about, too, the work of building anti-racist communities and how reconciliation may sound good to those who have more power, and it may sound suspect to those who have less. In fact in some anti-racism work reconciliation is not the goal while honest, mutual relationships might be still attainable.
      In many situations we may have to continue to look for ways to be in trusting relationships even when reconciliation may not be possible or even advisable. Power differentials have to be acknowledged and abuses of power must be exposed for reconciliation to really have integrity. I think about a sermon I preached many years ago and suggested how different the story of Joseph may have been if it was a story, instead, of Josephine who was a survivor of abuse. What does Christian forgiveness and reconciliation look like when those who survive the wrongs do not find favor and do not come from a position of power?
      The Confession of 1967 takes us back to how Christ creates a possibility when we find our power in Him. I would love to hear more about your sermon.

      Reply
  3. cindy cheatham pietkiewicz

    Great blog post and I know that god will give you wisdom and courage at whatever comes through this next challenge or change if it comes

    Reply
    1. Marcia

      Thank you, Cindy. God has never let us down in giving us what we need before! I love the song “On Time God” that says “He may not come when you want Him, but He’ll be there right on time.”

      Reply
  4. Susan Steinberg

    Marcia,

    Thank you for the wisdom of this post. You are surrounded by a community of friends who care about you, so whatever happens, you are not alone.

    Reply

    1. The ego of free agency–wow, that’s a sports metaphor that applies everywhere. If we all stopped asking, “What about me?” every few minutes, how much better would this world be? We need each other so much. There’s an enemy within, but love conquers all if we listen to the small, still voice.

      Thanks so much for this wisdom and for what you give to others, Marcia.

      Lyn

      Reply
      1. Marcia

        Thanks, Lyn. I hope you’ll be a guest blogger sometime here. I think folks would love to hear from you here!

        Reply
    2. Marcia

      Thank you, Susan. What a blessing to be a part of such a supportive community.

      Reply
  5. Liz Dowling-Sendor

    Thank you so much for your reflections on football and, more broadly, on all of life experiences. What wisdom you have shared about “the sin of free agency.” You and your family and the team are in my prayers. Know that you are surrounded by much love and support.

    Reply
    1. Marcia

      Thank you, Liz. We are all thankful for your prayers!

      Reply

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